PGCHE CRJ Week 10: Inclusive Teaching & Learning

This week’s reflection, I am taking a slightly different approach with what I regularly use, which is using the prompt questions. During this week’s reading and writing on inclusivity practice in Higher Education, I am also preparing my teaching module’s assessment. So it has been brilliant opportunity to me to construct my assessment documents. A few of things I gather from the reading which I have not considered:

  • Levels of responsibility based on the role in Higher Education we are serving as. I found that the checklist is eye opening and helps me to carefully consider my A&F strategy.
  • Potential problems such as: lack of information to students on assessment matters, poor moderation, variability of standards and lack of assessment criteria (Quality Assurance Agency 2006a).
  • Mitigating extenuating circumstances and how this is reflected on my A&F plan
  • How students can be helped with the feedback they will receive. Often I thought about the A&F stopped when feedback is distributed, but it goes beyond that. How to make sure students get the benefits of the A&F.
  • Data protection strategy. What will I do with the assessment data, who will have access to it?
  • Giving regular assessments, serial assignments building to a larger assignment for summative assessment.
  • Reassessment strategies. It is a crucial but yet something I seemed to miss, what happen if a student failed? When will s/he re-take?
  • “How students need to be encouraged to celebrate their diversity and differences and how the A&F can enrich their academic work”
  • There are many ways to make sure that equal opportunities are achieved, one of the example mention the inclusive assessment tasks.
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PGCHE CRJ Week 9: Assessment & Feedback II

1. To what extent do you think you have achieved each of the learning outcomes for this week? If you think there is room for you to achieve these more fully, how could you do this?
Reflecting on giving and receiving feedback is an interesting quick discussion this week. I had thorough look on the brief for second assignment and questions were noted, for the webinar. Outlining and rationaling the new assessment strategies I am a slightly confused about.

2. What have you learned this week about formative and summative assessment and feedback in HE?
They should be designed to test whether students have met the criteria in relation to the learning outcomes. They are deployed differently, and formative assessments ideally help to build on the formative assessment.

3. How did you learn this? What supported you?
From the digital resources, in particular “The Handbook for Teaching and Learning”.

4. What have you learned this week about the practice of supporting student learning in HE?
As daunting as assessments for students, it is also a big task for lecturers to make sure that fairness, consistency and reliability are achieved.

5. How has your understanding of this changed from doing this week’s topic and activities?
Nothing major as reading list is pretty much a continuation from previous week.

6. What has challenged you?
Thinking through in detail about the assessment that currently I am doing, and writing the rationale in words. So far it has always been in my head only and I have not externalised them.

7. What has surprised you?
N/a

8. What has this taught you about your strengths in your practice in supporting student learning, through formative and summative assessment and feedback?
I can put myself to learners’ shoes and think about how would I like to get my learning process assessed.

9. What actions can you identify that you could take to further develop your practice in formative and summative assessment and feedback in the future?
Related to feedback and they should be constructed and given to students.

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PGCHE CRJ Week 8 (Week 7 was a reading week): Assessment & Feedback I

1. Consider what you have learned about your own and others’ practice in supporting student learning from doing this week’s activities.
I’ve come to appreciate a little more about the intricacies of assessment, particularly the link between LOs and assessment, and validity/ reliability of assessment instruments. The surface approach vs deep approach has also made for interesting reading.

2. What have you learned this week about formative and summative assessment and feedback in HE?
Formative assessment constitutes assessment of learning, whereas summative assessment is mostly diagnostic and aids in the learning process.

3. How did you learn this?
From Bloxham and Boyd (2007), also from my own experience.

4. What supported you to do that?
I followed the recommended reading, and reflected on my own experience as both an educator and a learner.

5. What have you learned this week about the practice of supporting student learning in HE?
The crucial role of summative assessment in the learning process.

6. How has your understanding of this changed from doing this week’s topic and activities?
I now have a more theoretical background to support my anecdotal experience.

7. What has challenged you about doing this?
The logistical issues of assessment in online courses, brought about by the pandemic. The lack of second marker as I am the sole facilitator of this module.

8. What has surprised you?
“Cue seeking”, i.e. learners’ motivation being instrumental- to pass assessments.

9. What has this taught you about your strengths in your practice in supporting student learning, through formative and summative assessment and feedback?
That my “instincts” were largely correct, and supported in literature.

10. What actions can you identify from this that you could take to further develop your practice in formative and summative assessment and feedback in the future?
I need to think a little more about inter-rater (or inter-marker) reliability, as I am the sole tutor on this module.

11. How well do you think you have achieved the learning outcomes for this week (found in the Introduction section)? Is there anything else you could do to achieve these learning outcomes for this week?
As mentioned previously, I am an early-career educator, so I think more practical experience in the field- as many of my peers have- would be invaluable.

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PGCHE CRJ Week 6: Reflective Teaching Practice & Learning Conversations II

1. What have you learned this week about face-to-face teaching practice in HE?
From other peers’ teaching practice, I learnt that a clear structure of session is really important. I also notice that my peers are very confident on delivering materials, which I find myself lacking at. Students engagement is also issues which are always occur, and lecturers should be equipped to deal with this situation impromptu. Bloom’s taxonomy is also a useful scheme to reflect on our teaching practices.

2. How did you learn this?
From peers’ micro-teach session, the learning conversation forms of my own micro teach sessions and my peers’ review on my session.

3. What supported you to do that?
The draft of the learning conversations and discussions in the online forum related to mine and others also supported the decision. During webinar also I made an executive decision that I needed to create my session in Indonesia, where I am in lieu of online learning I am currently involve in.

4. What have you learned this week about the practice of supporting student learning in HE?
Although session is carefully crafted and planned, it is important to have a back-up plan in terms of materials, activities and also IT issues. Re-iterating LOs at the end of session also seems to be a good practice.

5. How has your understanding of this changed from doing this week’s topic and activities?
Developing a reflective practice is a good way to improve our teaching skills, as well as documenting strategies which work and did not work for future reference.

6. What has challenged you about doing this?
Being over criticising my own practice I think it is pretty normal, however I should not dwell on small details and focus on a big picture on how I can improve my teaching skill.

7. What has surprised you?
Peer’s review on my session (which I thought was not good) appeared to be in contradiction with my personal observations.

8. What has this taught you about your strengths in your practice in supporting student learning?
I have a clear aim in mind and good method of delivering the LOs.

9. What actions can you identify from this that you could take to further develop your practice of supporting student learning in face-to-face teaching in the future?
In terms of execution, I am still lacking of the skills. I hope by practicing and reflecting it will be improved.

10. How well do you think you have achieved the stated learning outcomes for this week? Is there anything else you could do to achieve these?
I think it went OK. The stated learning outcomes could have been achieved with better preparation, but due to my unique circumstances, I think it went as well as it could.

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PGCHE CRJ Week 5: Theories of Learning

1. How do these activities you have done recently to support your students’ learning relate to the theoretical approaches in the ‘Learning Theories Table Summary’, and their assumptions and implications for practice?
My recent practice does not seem to fit exactly into one of the theories. I guess most educators’ also do not fit exactly to one, but instead a mixture of these four established theories. However, I found that experiential is the closest to my field, in particular the use of my own experience.

2. Which theoretical approaches does your own practice tend to favour, in your own context of supporting student learning? How and why?
As mentioned, Kolb’s experiential learning as this theory seems to be most relevant to architectural studies. For instance, the use of design precedents (case studies) is commonly used to facilitate learning. Critical reflection of these case studies, informed with personal observations.

3. How might this relate to your choices in your design and delivery of your micro-teach activity for your EDU710 Assignment 1? (NB in later weeks it could be useful to apply this question and the ones below to your evaluation of your colleagues’ micro-teach sessions also)
With the limited time of micro-teach activity, design of activities is carefully planned. Encouraging students to critically reflect on tasks, by using an online peer evaluation is due to be tested. A nod to the experiential theory. In addition, related to other theoretical approaches, behaviourism approach also provide a consideration of interaction with the environment, in this micro-teach session case is the other learners. From the cognitive theories, materials are to be presented in ways that grab attention. And from humanistic approach, emphasising on student-centred approaches by facilitating students-led discussions.

4. Where might there be gaps in your practice (e.g. in terms of the approaches you tend to use and theoretical approaches that underpin them)?
The assumption in experiential approach whereby new experience is evaluated against prior experience is something I would like to consider in the future. Starting a session eliciting what students know and then closing the session with addressing new knowledge gained during the class.

5. What ideas does this prompt for you to make more use of theoretical approaches and associated teaching practices which you tend not to utilise, in order to expand and develop your practice of supporting student learning in the future?
Breaking tasks down into small components. I tend to overload students with new knowledge, and the practice of reminding students of prior learning will help to promote a meaningful learning.

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PGCHE EDU710 Assignment 1 Practice Class: Materials

Due to the fact that I am unable to record my students in China (as we started the semester on distance learning) with the support of friends and family; I am recording a session in Surabaya, Indonesia.

Here are the slides:

PGCHE teaching practice slides low

And here are the supporting  materials:

Group 1

Group 2 

 Group 3

Link to the peer evaluation, click here.

Online forum discussion can be found at the bottom of this page.

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PGCHE CRJ Week 4: Reflective Teaching Practice & Learning Conversations 2

I should preface this reflection by saying that I have not yet delivered the 20- minute micro teaching session, so what I am reflecting on below is largely hypothetical and based on my contemplation of potential issues. It will be amended once I have delivered the session.

1. What have you learned this week about face-to-face teaching practice in HE?
I have learned while preparing online materials for my module and guest lecture that I struggle a little with oral delivery. I tend to speak quickly and quietly and I anticipate that unless I allow for this in the face to face session, my students may have difficulty following me.

2. How did you learn this?
This was from listening to my own voice on my recordings, several of which I had to re-record. A family member also commented on this.

3. What supported you to do that?
It was possible to re-record audios, but in the actual 20-minute session, I will ask my students at the beginning to prompt me if I am speaking too quickly.

4. What have you learned this week about the practice of supporting student learning in HE?
I am now more understanding of student needs, and have given consideration to the productive nature of tasks.

5. How has your understanding of this changed from doing this week’s topic and activities?
I have learnt a lot from the forum posts of my fellow participants in this course, and the exchange of information and discussion have proven invaluable.

6. What has challenged you about doing this?
Accepting other ideologies and viewpoints. It’s easy to become fixed in one’s thinking without external engagement.

7. What has surprised you?
Some of the techniques employed by my fellow participants, particularly those involved in completely different areas from my own. It’s interesting to see which techniques are portable.

8. What has this taught you about your strengths in your practice in supporting student learning?
I have always been student-focused, but this week has challenged my ideas about what that actually means. I believe I have improved in this area.

9. What actions can you identify from this that you could take to further develop your practice of supporting student learning in face-to-face teaching in the future?
Interactivity between tutor/ student, and between students, should be one of my focuses henceforth. I am interested to find more practical ways to facilitate this.

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PGCHE CRJ Week 3: Learning Design

This week my colleagues and I learnt to critically consider about lesson plan. Here is my Week 3 (Introduction to Learning Design) reflection.

1. What have you learned this week about learning design and session planning?
Key concepts are: learning aims, learning outcomes (Los), students’ background and prior knowledge, differentiation, assessment and feedback strategies to see how far students achieve towards what intended to be achieved stated in LOs and student-centered learning.

2. How did you learn this?
Through the given materials (podcasts, additional reading and other resources) and activities such as reading other peers’ thoughts in forum. In addition, bounced some ideas with friends who have experience on HE teaching. This new knowledge is then inform my decision to carefully constructing a lesson plan, the first draft.

3. What supported you?
The Session Planning Form helped me to think through each considerations, serving as a framework. I found it very useful for somebody who is lacking in terms of teaching experience. Reading peers’ thoughts are also beneficial to put the reading I have done in the context.

4. What have you learned this week about the practice of supporting student learning in HE?
It is worth to spend time to consider the lesson plan and try to contextualise them in a bigger picture (the module, the course, etc) and on anticipated constraints (time, resources, etc). It is more likely that successful learning will be achieved this way.

5. How has your understanding of this changed from doing this week’s topic and activities?
We touched on factoring students’ individual learning styles and levels at the beginning of the course. This week I learned in depth about recognising, communicating and ways to address these different learning situations.

6. What has challenged you?
Planning the session and bearing in mind that it will be able to be executed according to plans. I think this is a growing practice and the more I teach, I will be more conversant on delivering sessions according to my plans.

7. What has surprised you?
Ideally wordings on LOs are more precise rather than vague. The clearer they are, the better they are to facilitate learning. They also need to be observable, measurable and directly relate to the assessment criteria.
Also, what we state in LOs is what requires to pass, not a high grade.

8. What has this taught you about your strengths in your practice in supporting student learning?
To be honest, very sparse. I have not thought about discussed important concepts in depth, although I tried to be putting students’ hat while creating materials and learning activities.

9. What actions can you identify from this that you could take to further develop your practice in the future?
• To obtain more pertinent data of my students
• Having a precise LOs to help me and my students
• Communicate how the LOs are in direct relation to assessment criteria to students
• To incorporate more formative assessments
• To incorporate ways in differentiations such as through the use of: content, process, expected product, and learning environment.

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PGCHE CRJ Week 2: Reflections and reflective practice

1. What have you learned this week about reflection and reflective practice? How did you learn this?
Reflections are useful to improve teaching practice. It can be explored through reflections of our own experience and other colleagues’.

2. What have you learned this week about the practice of supporting student learning in HE?
These incidental matter occurred and observed during teaching practice has fundamental effects of students through the act of self reflections.

3. How has your understanding changed from doing this week’s topic and activities?
Reflections are beneficial not just for educators, but also for students and institutions.

4. What has challenged you?
Finding a systematic analysis to conduct a meaningful reflective practice. Through my peers, I learnt that there is no one-size-fits-all solution, and I believe it is a growing practice.

5. What has surprised you?
Learning from peers provides a strong analytical baseline to inform our own reflective practice.

6. What has this taught you about your strengths in your practice?
Ability to response quickly to a problem, which then any positives and negatives reflections need to be recorded immediately for future purpose.

7. What actions might you take to further develop your practice?
A template which I use for basic self-reflections. Draft of template as follow:
Class’ details (time, place, about the module, aim and objectives of the session, number of students, etc)
Issues arising
How I dealt with the issues
What would I do differently
Additional remarks

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PGCHE Week 1: CRJ (Creative Reflective Journal)

Here is my Week 1 reflection. I used the questions to guide me.

1. What have you learned about the practice of supporting student learning in HE?
There are many aspects to be considered on supporting student learning. The common themes I identified were: 1) understanding learners and appropriate learning styles to develop 2) appropriate learning methods, 3) feedback and assessment of students and also for teachers, which then lead to 4) awareness of quality assurance and 5) understanding of wider HE context.

2. How has your understanding of this changed from doing this week’s topic and activities?
The UKPSF provides a systematic framework to self- evaluate our teaching practice the common themes I have identified, through the A,K and V dimensions.

3. What has challenged you?
Being able to take into account all of these perimeters at the same time without prior knowledge.

4. What has surprised you?
Case study number one on the digital resource list, in a book entitled “The Handbook for Teaching and Learning in HE”. The three major categories lecturers are being appraised are by demonstrating sufficient contribution in terms of: knowledge creation, knowledge dissemination and enabling activities. I was struck with the way these three were classified.
Also diversity of learners is a concept I did not consider before.

5. What have you learned about your own experience and practice of supporting student learning?
My curriculum design skill is in the top list of improvement.

6. In which specific aspects of supporting student learning do you have strong experience?
Possibly in design and planning learning activities, although with my limited experience, there are rooms for big improvements.

7. In which specific aspects of supporting student learning do you think you need to develop stronger experience, knowledge and skills?
Curriculum design, time management, systematic ways to appraise myself and my effectiveness to create suitable learning environment and experience and identifying learners’ needs better.

8. What actions might you take to develop your practice in each of the different aspects you identified for further development?
Continuously use the UKPSF framework to self-evaluate my skills from time to time.

 

Note: I am undertaking a 30 weeks PGCHE course with Falmouth University, United Kingdom. PGCHE is a British teaching qualification for higher education professionals. In this page I will post my weekly reflections. Stay tuned.

 

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